Foodology

Science of Cocktails: Recap #SOC16

Diana Chan February 7, 2016 British Columbia, Event

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Last week, Science World at TELUS World of Science was lit blue to welcome guests to the Science of Cocktails. I was invited as a media guest for the evening to see all the amazing local bartenders showing off for the crowds. If you missed the event, check out all awesome bartenders and their drinks.

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Science World was transformed into Vancouver’s largest cocktail laboratory. Vancouverites attended to mix, mingle and be merry, for a great cause. This fundraising event, for Science World’s Class Field Trip Program provides kids from underfunded schools free access to Science World.

Through this night alone, they were able to raise $185,000!

Welcome Drink – Science of Gravity

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Once you get inside, you are greeted with a drink called El Ritmo made by Giancarlo Quiroz Jesus from The Diamond. It was a great way to start the night as it has stronger tastes of pineapple and coconut cream. The rum and cynar in it isn’t too strong.

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Different Receptors, Different Perceptions

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Mike Shum from Fairmont Pacific Rim put together a Daiquiri with Bacardi Superior, lime sugar and dextrose.

Science of Flavour Pairing

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Wesley Feist, the sous chef at Showcase Restaurant and Bar put together a Frozen Honey Mousse, Kaffir Lime Gel with a lemon grass crumble on top. I loved how they really put on a show with the liquid nitrogen.

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Although it didn’t have alcohol in it, I love the different textures especially the pop rocks on top.

Cocktails and Centrifuges

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Blood & Sand was the creation of Robyn Gray from Prohibition. It is a combination of Glenmorangie Single malt Whiskey, vermouth, Cherry Heering, clarified orange and citric acid.

Demonstration Stations

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A few booths around Science World would have some neat science experiments. What happens when you put balloon animals in liquid nitrogen?

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Don’t worry, no balloon animals were harmed in the making if this science experiment.

Dry Ice Aromatics

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This was a pretty weird booth where they make you breath in the vapours of Ardbeg Whiskey. You can really feel it burning down your throat without ingesting anything.

Science of Botanical Brewing

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Fentimans Sodas was showcased as another non-alcoholic option. I wished they did something more with the drink like turn it into a cocktail.

Science of Brewing

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Parallel 49 had 3 of their brews to try — Gypsy Tears, Tricycle Grapefruit Radler, and their Craft Lager. They were the only brewery present at the event.

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As a beer lover, I wish there were more beer booths.

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The Tricycle Grapefruit Radler was my favourite. It’s light and refreshing.

Science of Fermentation

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Traditional Collins and Kombucha Collins were demonstrated here.

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Never realized kombucha would be good mixed in a cocktail.

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Dehydration and Changing States of Liquid and Solids

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A fancy drink put together by Alex Black of Vancouver Club is a drink topped with Campari Candy floss. Below it, you can see Aperol, Prosecco and soda. A fun drink to consume.

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Whisky and Chocolate

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Beta 5 chocolates were paired with Glenlivet’s Founder Reserve.

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It was served neat.

Flair Physics

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Dave Simps of the Bartenders Guild did some gravity defying stunts while he mixed a Lynchberg Lemonade for everyone.

Carbonation on the Spot

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Cooper Tardival of Hawksworth created Paloma on the Spot, which has grapefruit syrup, water, line, Hornitos, and CO2.

Alcoholic Air

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Tarquin Melnyk from Bambudda created the Bubble, Airs and Foams drink with Jack Daniels, Lemon Lime, verawhip, and red wine.

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It looks quite impressive and you can see the different layers that make up the drink. At first, it was a bit weird with the addition of the red wine, but once you mix it together, it’s not bad at all.

Railtown Catering

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With all that alcohol, Railtown catering put together an amazing spread of food through out the entire building. The had stations on both floors with sliders, charcuterie, sushi, poutine, dessert. With all the hungry people in the building, they were able to churn out the food very quickly.

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I loved the charcuterie sections. I had a lot of meat and cheese!

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Bartender Showdown at Center Stage

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Besides drinking all night, there were a few demos and cocktail competitions happening on the main stage.

Vancouver’s top bartenders competed to win the evening’s Cocktail Competition, awarded by a panel of industry judges. Guests also voted for their favourite cocktails through their drink passports; the winning bartender will be given The People’s Choice award.

People’s Choice Bartender (tie)

  • Jon Smolensky -“A Match Made in Heaven”
  • Keenan Hood -“Moscow Mule”

Cocktail Competition

  • Mike Shum

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VIP Lounge

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There were 2 tiers of tickets – $145 general admission and $250 for VIP. The difference is that with VIP access, they get early event access to the event, valet parking, access to the Diageo Reserve World Class VIP Lounge, a selection of premium cocktail offerings, passed canapes service, exclusive event programming, VIP photo booth and a special thank you gift at the end of the night. If you hate crowds, then that might be the option for you if you can afford it.

It’s a nice experience not lining up for drinks, drinking from glass cups and ample seats to just relax.

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Overall, it was a very well-organized event. A few booths had long line ups, but you can always go to another booth and return later. To some people it felt like one huge open bar where you can try so many different types of alcohols. They tried educating people with some of the science behind the cocktails, but it a bit hard to make the connection at some booths. Nonetheless, it was a great event to raise funds for Science World’s Class Field Trip Program. An average class field trip to Science World, including transportation to and from the facility, a workshop, an OMNIMAX film and a take-home activity, costs between $900 and $1,100 per class. Since they raised $185,000, that will fund 168 classes to be able to go to Science World.

Websitehttp://scienceworld.ca/cocktails

About The Author

Diana started Foodology in 2010 because she just eats out everyday! She started a food blog to share her love of food with the world! She lives in Vancouver, BC and adores the diversity of food around her. She will go crazy for churros and lattes.